Tag Archives: worship

The Seven Churches

This is the second of four articles examining the Seven churches expositionally and practically. The Lord Jesus, the One in the midst of the seven lamp stands, is seen in all His glory. The lamp stands are interpreted for us in 1:20 as the seven churches. The Lord Jesus is in the central place, the place of concern, cognizance and control.

He views the various churches and sees them as they really are from heaven’s perspective. He looks to commend what can be commended and also adds words of condemnation and correction where needed. The Lord gives a call to hear and also offers compensation to those who belong to Him.

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Some Thoughts on Congregational Singing

Some time ago I was asked to write an article about singing in the church. Before I do, let me quickly give you some personal background, so you will know from what perspective I am writing. I became Christian at age 19, and for the first 20 years after my salvation attended a lively non-denominational church, where I also functioned as piano/bass player, choir director, and where at times I would lead congregational singing. Most songs we sang were contemporary choruses, many of which contained much scripture. From there my family moved on to a more traditional church, where the majority of the songs consisted of hymns, many written during the 18th and 19thcenturies. Here I also directed a choir, and have been frequently involved in worship and song-leading.

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Worshipping Worthily

Worshipping Worthily

A believer’s circumstances under the Law were quite different from those of a believer under grace. This is especially true when it comes to approaching God and expressing praise or thanksgiving to the Lord. The Old Testament saint was made to understand the condemnation resulting from his or her sin and the complexity involved in any cure by the variety of offerings that must be brought. Those offerings all prefigured Christ but were only types and could in themselves accomplish nothing; never setting the conscience of the worshiper free. They only served to remind him of the absolute holiness of God and his own spiritual inadequacy; his failure to “measure up”.

By bringing a burnt offering he would be reminded that he could only expect full fellowship with God by being completely devoted to His will and obedient to it — even unto death. In presenting a meal offering his conscience would recall how impure was his inner life; with a peace offering how often his thoughts and actions did not harmonize with heaven, and with the sin and trespass offerings would come the continual realization that he sinned and fell short of the Divine glory. These sacrifices were inefficient; could “never give the guilty conscience peace or wash away sin’s stain.” For, “in those sacrifices there was a reminder of sins every year.” (Heb.10:4)

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